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Our Research and Publications

Our Most Recent Work

July 15, 2020
Amanda Fuller, Director of the Texas Coast and Water Program at the National Wildlife Federation, discusses the importance of incorporating natural infrastructure into area flood planning efforts. She highlights the multiple benefits of nature-based approaches and emphasized the importance of centering equity concerns in infrastructure planning. The presentation was originally made to the Houston Galveston Area Council Flood Management Committee on July 15, 2020.
June 23, 2020
The Texas Living Waters Project has released the 2020 Texas Water Conservation Scorecard, an in-depth analysis and ranking of the water conservation efforts of more than 300 water utilities in Texas. Taken in conjunction with the 2016 report, the 2020 Scorecard reveals many utilities are not taking serious actions to advance water conservation. The Scorecard is an evaluation of utilities level of effort to advance water conservation rather than their performance in achieving conservation with the exception of two scoring criteria: their records on water loss and whether they met targets for reducing per-capita water use. Other scoring criteria evaluate a utility’s compliance with water conservation planning and reporting requirements, outdoor watering limits, and rate-based incentives for efficient use of water.
June 1, 2020

Starting in 2020, Texas stakeholders will have the opportunity to determine the best flood mitigation strategies for their region through a process called “flood planning.” Regional Flood Planning Groups will lead this effort, as prescribed by Senate Bill 8 enacted by the Texas Legislature in 2019.

Participating in the regional flood planning process as a RFPG member is a momentous opportunity to serve Texas communities. As a RFPG member, designees will not only advocate for the flood protection needs of their region, but will also have an opportunity to amplify Texas as a national leader in flood mitigation, adaptation, and resilience.

April 15, 2020
The Hill Country is no stranger to flooding. In 2015, the Memorial Day flood brought devastating rains to the region. As flood events grow stronger and more frequent, it is more important than ever to take advantage of opportunities to protect our citizens and natural heritage from these events. Senate Bill 7, established by the Texas Legislature in 2019, created the Flood Infrastructure Fund (FIF). The FIF is an important step towards building a more resilient Texas. Last fall, Texas voters approved a constitutional amendment to allocate $793 million to the FIF for structural and nonstructural flood mitigation projects, to be administered by the Texas Water Development Board (TWDB).
April 15, 2020
Since 2015, the Houston-Galveston region has experienced four “500-year” floods. In order to protect our citizens and continue to bring investment and innovation to the region, more must be done to protect lives and properties from flooding! Senate Bill 7, established by the Texas Legislature in 2019, created the Flood Infrastructure Fund (FIF). The FIF is an important step towards building a more resilient Texas. Last fall, Texas voters approved a constitutional amendment to allocate $793 million to the FIF for structural and nonstructural flood mitigation projects, to be administered by the Texas Water Development Board.
September 23, 2019
The One Water approach offers tremendous opportunities for improving how water is managed within communities. Using water efficiently and taking advantage of diverse, locally available water supplies are important goals. It is also important that the approach support communities in assessing how their water use affects the health of waterways, both upstream, where water is sourced, and downstream, where other communities and aquatic resources may be impacted. This document shares preliminary findings from a survey that assesses whether the One Water approach is realizing its potential to meaningfully ensure healthy waterways. This report also shares findings on the current “state of practice” through a series of interviews with a cross-section of utility staff, planners, engineers, and scientists involved in One Water implementation.
June 17, 2019
This guidebook explores the strategies in Texas’ water security toolbox, good and bad. By using this tool to make informed and forward-thinking decisions about where to invest Texans’ money, communities can prepare for both flood and drought without sacrificing wildlife and the environment.
March 20, 2018
The Texas Living Waters Project has designed this follow-up Water Conservation by the Yard report as a statewide analysis of outdoor water savings potential. This report explores regional potential water savings that could result from the implementation of no more than twice-per-week outdoor watering restrictions. With case studies, recommended education and enforcement strategies, and a draft model ordinance, this report was designed as a resource for municipalities to design and implement their own outdoor irrigation ordinances.