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Water conservation by the yard-estimated savings from outdoor watering restrictions

March 2015

Outdoor water use, particularly lawn watering, accounts for almost one third of annual residential water use in Texas, and can represent a much higher percentage during our hot, dry summers. Studies show that homeowners have a tendency to overwater landscapes by as much as two to three times the amount needed.

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Desalination: Is it Worth its Salt?

November 2013

Desalination is often viewed as a solution to many water supply problems and is often hailed as a ‘drought resistant’ supply. This report explores the environmental, energy, and economic issues surrounding desalination and provides an overview of desalination activities in Texas.

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@txwater

Conference Materials: 2016 Central Texas Water Conservation Symposium

Seton Administrative Offices
1345 Philomena Street
Austin, TX
February 2, 2016
8:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m.

The 6th Annual Central Texas Water Conservation Symposium theme was  “Conservation, Come Drought or High Water.” The symposium was sponsored by: Austin Water, AARO, Aqua Water Supply Corporation, Barton Springs Edwards Aquifer Conservation District, Capital Area Suburban Exchange, Cedar Park, Lower Colorado River Authority, Round Rock Texas Utilities and Environmental Services, City of Pflugerville, Seton […]

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The Southwest is Swallowing Texas: As grass gives way to desert across the Lone Star State, the nation’s fastest growing cities may be left high and dry.

U.S. News & World Report, February 3, 2016

The High Plains begin around the 100th meridian. It’s where the verdant green of the Gulf of Mexico and Southeastern U.S. gives way to arid scrub, shortgrass and prickly pear cactus – where riders on horseback in the 1800s, nearly a century and a half before satellite mapping, were able to trace the border between these two regions as they split Oklahoma from the Texas Panhandle.

These days, the meridian’s more or less paralleled to the east by Interstate 35, a steel-and-concrete vine that connects the Texas cities of Dallas, Fort Worth, San Marcos, Austin and San Antonio. Each ranks among the fastest-growing cities in America, their reservoirs reliably refreshed by rainwater.

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With water issues on tap, House committee looks at statewide solutions

Austin American Statesman, February 2, 2016

Anticipating a continuing tug of war over water — increasingly scarce in mostly dry, fast-growing Texas — a state House committee is examining the prospect of a statewide water grid.

A proposal to at least study the issue was killed in the last legislative session, the victim of a struggle that generally pits rural lawmakers against their urban counterparts. For years the state has been riven by dispute between the water haves and have-nots, with an alphabet soup of river authorities, groundwater districts and state agencies grappling with how to meet the needs of growing cities.

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With water issues on tap, House committee looks at statewide solutions

Austin American Statesman, February 2, 2016

Anticipating a continuing tug of war over water — increasingly scarce in mostly dry, fast-growing Texas — a state House committee is examining the prospect of a statewide water grid.

A proposal to at least study the issue was killed in the last legislative session, the victim of a struggle that generally pits rural lawmakers against their urban counterparts. For years the state has been riven by dispute between the water haves and have-nots, with an alphabet soup of river authorities, groundwater districts and state agencies grappling with how to meet the needs of growing cities.

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editorial

Swift action: Water utilities statewide need to develop plans for saving water.

Houston Chronicle, January 26, 2016

The state’s 2012 water plan forecasts that by 2060, water demand will increase by 22 percent, while water supply will decrease by about 10 percent. Yet billions of gallons are lost through leakage in our water utility systems every year. As Texas gets drier and adds population, every drop of water counts.

The state cannot meet the challenge of water supply simply through developing new sources. Utilities need to become more efficient and eliminate waste in their systems. Texas has secured a means to finance enhanced efficiency efforts. Voters approved a state constitutional amendment in 2013 to provide financial assistance for water utilities to pursue projects recommended in state and regional water plans. The state water implementation fund, or SWIFT, won the endorsement of environment groups, such as the Sierra Club, in part because the legislation accompanying SWIFT contained a conservation component, according to Ken Kramer, water resources chairman for the Texas Sierra Club.

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